Court Reporter Louisville KY & Lexington KY Battery Blob

Don’t Throw Away that Battery Tester Just Yet!

As a court reporter and deposition videographer, I watched this YouTube video sent to me today by email and thought, wow, that’s great, no more tossing half-used batteries!  So, after turning the office upside-down trying to find a few dead batteries to test, and giving it that old court reporter try, it just goes to show, you can’t believe everything you read or see on the Internet. 

Don’t believe me? Try this for yourself, just don’t try it on the job!  #soconvincing

court reporter Louisville KY & Lexington KY visit courtroom

Court Proposes Changes to Local Rules

I recently received an email “Message from Chief Jefferson Circuit Court Judge Audra J. Eckerle – In lieu of weekly e-brief.”  The email states, “THIS MESSAGE IS BEING SENT ON BEHALF OF CHIEF JEFFERSON CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE AUDRA J. ECKERLE:”

The message begins “The Jefferson Rules of Practice (known informally as the “Local Rules”) have not been amended since 2006.”  The message goes on to say, “Pursuant to SCR 1.040(3)(a), we tender to you now the proposed amendments that the Circuit Court Term has voted to approve.”  See the Proposed Changes

As a member of the Kentucky Court Reporters Association, as well as the Louisville Bar Association, I have some concerns with the proposed changes to Jefferson County’s Local Practice Rules, in particular the section underlined below: 

1202 Filing Depositions with the Court

“CR 30.06 notwithstanding, only the cd/DVD/disc/videotape of the deposition shall be filed with the Clerk. The original hard copy of the deposition shall be maintained by the party noticing the deposition and shall be made available to any party for inspection and/or copying. Excerpts of relevant portions of any deposition may be offered in support of and attached to any pleading with the Court.”

I believe this proposed change places the burden on the taking attorney to maintain, safeguard, and reproduce court records.  For example, the taking attorney may have the responsibility of providing a time and place for any and all parties to handle and inspect the original transcript, quite possibly providing someone to supervise the original’s handling, such as was the case when the court clerks kept watch over those viewing files as they sat in a designated area observable to the clerks.   Some attorneys may not have the copy power to reproduce large-volume transcripts, audio or video recordings, or color copies, adding further complication to reproducing the original.

In addition, I believe opposing counsel will increasingly expect the taking attorney to produce the original for inspection and/or copying at no charge, creating a decrease in revenue to the taxpaying court reporter caused by the loss of a transcript copy sale, which the court reporter created originally.  If court reporters lose that transcript copy sale, our businesses would suffer a significant financial loss.  It would be difficult to continue to pay office rent and expenses, salaries, insurance, and taxes without adding a steep increase to the cost of the original transcript, further burdening the taking attorney with this additional charge.

As I see it, under the proposed change as stated in CR 30.06, a huge and unfair burden would be placed on the taking attorney, that being: 

  1. The increased cost of an original transcript charged by the court reporter to recoup the cost of the lost copy sales. 
  2. Having to furnish a supervised place and time for parties to view the original transcript and exhibits.
  3. Not all attorneys have the setup to allow all parties to come in and view DVDs.

I believe the cost of an attorney-copied original transcript would be more costly than if copied and sold by the court reporter that originally created it because of comment 1 above. The proposed change does not address what a fair charge is for such copy work done by the taking attorney.  Court Reporter’s rates are limited to what the market will bear. 

I propose that the Court continue to allow court reporters to seal the original transcripts until such time as they are deemed necessarily opened by the Court.  If opposing counsel would like a copy of the transcript, I hope we can maintain the status quo, whereby the court reporter is called and asked by counsel to produce a copy for them at a set rate.   By providing a sealed original to the taking attorney, it protects the integrity of the original transcript and exhibits, while not taking up space at the courthouse.

Lastly, I see a conflict in the language between 1201, Section 4 and 1202 as to who maintains the original video.  I propose the video be maintained by the taking attorney, as is the current practice, and filed with the Court as the Court deems necessary.

We at Taylor Court Reporting Kentucky encourage all Kentucky court reporters, Louisville court reporters, Kentucky legal videographersLouisville legal videographers, and attorneys to review the proposed changes and express opinions with Eric Darnell, Circuit Court Administrator, at ericdarnell@kycourts.net or 595-4588 by August 30, 2013.

Linda L. Taylor
Certified Court Reporter – KY

Video Depositions – Best Shooting Practices

Kentucky Court Reporters & Video Depositions Statewide

A professional deposition videographer is likely to be the first person to arrive at your scheduled deposition.  Taylor Court Reporters Kentucky videographers arrive an hour prior to the scheduled start time of any deposition in order that we might assess the video deposition space for size, lighting, seating capacity, electrical outlets, and table size.

Some depositions are easier to shoot than others.  We all have been jammed into a doctor’s small examination room with several attorneys, a court reporter, witness, videographer with all their equipment, and a seven foot examination table.  Videographers do the best they can, given the circumstances, and by showing up early, arranging chairs, lighting, and setting up camera and microphones, running a few tests, things should go smoothly. A professional videographer comes equipped with several tricks in their bag to make the most of any situation. 

Shooting configurations can vary depending on the circumstances, lighting, windows, table size, number of participants, but what is the ideal shooting configuration, and why?  Taylor Court Reporter Kentucky videographers are instructed to shoot across the table, with the questioning attorney to the immediate right or left of the camera, with the court reporter at the end of the table between the witness and questioning attorney.  Using this method, the witness is looking at the camera or slightly off to one side or the other.  We choose this method of shooting rather than shooting down the length of the table.

Why not make everyone comfortable and shoot down the length of the table with counsel lining both sides of the table?  The problems with shooting in this fashion are many.  Consider this:  The questioning attorney is sitting directly to the right or left of the witness, the camera is focused on the witness alone.  The picture you get is one of the witness constantly in profile answering questions and not appearing to speak to the jury.  The jury is more engaged when the witness appears to be speaking to them directly instead of looking off camera, speaking to an unseen person.

Another problem with shooting the length of the table is a cluttered picture.  Coffee cups, files, and hands get in the way of a long shot.  The framing of the witness in this configuration is wider than the across-the-table shot, allowing more opportunity for the distraction of stray water bottles and tissue boxes.

So the next time you attend a video deposition, bear with the videographer as they ask you to sit here or there.  They are the professionals and are trying to get the best audio and video record of the proceedings possible with the end result being a video record with which everyone will be pleased.

 

Kentucky Map shows areas covered by Taylor Court Reporters Kentucky

Kentucky Statewide Court Reporters & Video

Taylor Court Reporters Kentucky is headquartered in Louisville, KY, yet many days you’ll find our court reporters and legal deposition videographers on the road. A typical week finds us with video depositions and steno depositions scheduled anywhere in Kentucky Bowling Green, Elizabethtown, GeorgetownLexington, London, Nicholasville, Northern Kentucky, Owensboro, Paducah – anywhere, and we cover them all.  When a client calls, Taylor Court Reporters Kentucky has the professional office staff to balance a busy book with a clear, cool head, and a bit of humor. Our court reporters and legal deposition videographers are dedicated professionals, most with advanced degrees, and the well-rounded knowledge to get the job done.

When booking a job with Taylor Court Reporters Kentucky, you’ll get the quality, experience, and professionalism you’re looking for.  You’ll find our pricing fair and competitive, and remember, there is NEVER A TRAVEL FEE!

Taylor Court Reporters Kentucky has meeting rooms available throughout the state of Kentucky.  Call our office today at (502) 671-8110 with your date, time, and location and let us book a deposition room and court reporter for you.  Deposition videographers are always available, too.

When you become a client of Taylor Court Reporters Kentucky, you can reap the benefits of all we have to offer, so contact us today to see what we can do for you!

Taylor Court Reporting Kentucky

200 S. Fifth Street

Suite 610 North

Louisville, Kentucky 40202

(502)  671-8110

linda@taylorcourtreporters.com

Transcribe: Great Free Web app for Court Reporters

The Chrome Web Store rolled out a free web app back in August 2012 called Transcribe.  It’s a nice little program for some to use, but your Louisville Kentucky court reporters, Taylor Court Reporting KY, needs more. We like Transcribe for its ability to import MP3 and WAV files for proofreading our deposition and arbitration transcripts.  The free version of Transcribe offers five useful shortcut keys:

  • Esc: pause/resume
  • F1:  slow down
  • F2:  speed up
  • F3:  rewind 2 seconds
  • F4:  forward 2 seconds

You can purchase the Transcribe Pro version, also available at the Chrome Web Store, with a few upgrades.  The upgraded Pro version works on a cloud platform so you can work at any computer from home, the office, or on the road.  Pro allows you to upload multiple audio files and export your transcripts as doc files. This pay option will save you from having to copy and paste as you do with the free version.

Transcribe Pro has several different plans. You can choose the Solo plan at $19.00 a month. The Solo plan comes with 8 hours of audio and 20 documents.  You can get the Premium Plan for $29.00 a month and it will give you 14 hours of audio and 30 documents.  For the casual user that needs a little more, there is a pay-as-you-go plan that comes in at $3.00 an hour for audio with 10 documents.  If you want a time code showing the current audio position and have the ability to import WMA files, you’ll need the Pro version.

An iOS app became available in November of 2012.  The iOS platform allows you to record audio directly to your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad, and you can then upload the files automatically to your Transcribe Pro account.  You’ll manually have to transfer the audio to your computer with the free version.  (What a great back-up audio option for deposition court reporters.)

Visit the Chrome Web Store to download either the free version of Transcribe or Transcribe Pro, the paid version.  You can also download Transcribe and Transcribe Pro from the Taylor Court Reporting Kentucky website, just go to the Clients section and follow the Downloads link.

If there was anything we would like to see improved on the free version, it would be an “always-on-top” option and the ability to reassign the hotkeys.  With those two caveats in mind, Taylor Court Reporting, your Louisville Kentucky Court Reporters, can give the free version of Transcribe for Chrome users two thumbs up!

Read the reviews.

Video Depositions – How to Fold a Pop Up Screen

Taylor Court Reporters Louisville Kentucky & Lexington Kentucky | Video Deposition 

Your Louisville Kentucky Video Deposition court reporters use the professional Savage collapsible backgrounds to create a more polished, professional look to your video depositions. These collapsible screens give your picture a softer, richer feel.  They are lightweight and easily set up, but when it comes time to  pack up and go home, well, that’s another story, that is, until we found this video on line, showing the proper technique for quickly folding your Savage collapsible background.  Now it’s a snap.  

Watch the video and see what appears to be a magician at work!