Write it Down!

Court Reporters, Get it Right! 

After the deposition, a court reporter usually asks, “Would you like a large transcript, condensed, E-transcript, E-Transcript only, or would you like all of the above?”
The first attorney may say, “I’ll take a large transcript, a condensed transcript, and an E-Transcript.”
The second attorney may say, “I’ll take a large transcript only, but call my assistant, Gina, and see if we take an E-Transcript, too.”
That’s just the first two transcript orders and you’ve got three more orders to go.   If you want to save yourself a few calls later for “clarification,” or because your memory “just isn’t what it used to be” WRITE IT DOWN!
If an attorney tells you he’s changed firms or he has a new address, don’t rely on your memory.  By the time you get around to scoping and proofing the deposition transcript, there’s a good chance you’ll have forgotten what was said and then you’ll have to spend (waste) time researching the answer.  If you want to save yourself time and aggravation, WRITE IT DOWN!
Let’s say there’s a trial date at the end of the month, but there’s a mediation in two weeks.  They’d like the transcript by the 10th.  You think you’ll never forget that date because you’ve got a lot of work to do between now and then, sync the video to the text and upload the video and synced transcript to your online repository.  Keep yourself on track as the days zip by, know the date its due – WRITE IT DOWN!
In these days of information overload, rush transcripts, and production demands, it’s easy to forget something, but there is one way to cut down on errors, and it’s easy enough – WRITE IT DOWN!